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For over nine years,Wendel White has been venturing to countless museums throughout the U.S. to photograph historical black artifacts for his Manifest photo series.

From a lock of Frederick Douglass hair andFBI files on Malcolm X to a tambourine once played by Prince,Whites collection of nearly 100 photos allows for continual consumption of black history.

[The title] Manifest evokes the complicated notions of slavery as cargo or inventory and the notion that these objects are also a collection or reliquary of African-American experience and memory, White, who currently resides in New Jersey, told The Huffington Post last week.

He said that historical black artifacts are often overlooked by most museums.

My photographs are meant to describe and materialize the experience of encountering objects that have been traveling through time stored in cabinets, on shelves and in warehouses for centuries or just a few years, White said.

I am increasingly interested in the residual power of the past to inhabit these material remains, he continued. The ability of objects to transcend lives, centuries and millennia suggests a remarkable mechanism for folding time, bringing the past and the present into a shared space that is uniquely suited to artistic exploration.

Wendel whos been collecting for the Manifest seriessince 2008 finds his subjects through research and suggestions from friends. While some of his material is gathered from private archives, the majority of it comes from public collections.

Manifest was first exhibited at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, and has since been on display at museums across the country. A number of the collections newer additions are from exhibits at the highly buzzed-about National Museum of African American History and Culture,including a piece of stained glass destroyed in the1963 bombingof the 16th Street Baptist Church in Alabama,which killed four young girls.

White said the remnant was one of the most painful objects hes photographed.

Take a look at some of the most striking images from the Manifest portfolio below:

  • Decorative Coin Bank

    Cape May Museum, Cape May Courthouse, New Jersey

  • Bible Owned By Former Cape May Slave Ishmael Armour

    James Hand Collection, Cape May Museum, Cape May Courthouse, New Jersey

  • Portrait

    Brownville History Museum, Brownville, Nebraska

  • Stained Glass, 16th Street Baptist Church

    National Museum of African American History, Washington, D.C.

  • Cleaver for President, Douglas County Historical Society, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Frederick Douglass Hair

    Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Nebraska, 2012

  • Patsy Flanagan Carter

    State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa

  • Little Black Sambo (1921)

    Paul R. Schopp Collection, Riverton, New Jersey

  • Father Flannigan And President Coolidge At Boystown

    Douglass County Historical Society, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Tape Recorder Used By Malcolm X At Mosque #7

    National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, D.C.

  • Baby Dolls, Kenneth and Mamie Clark

    National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, D.C.

  • Afro-American Sentinel, 1899

    Great Plains Black History Museum, Omaha, Nebraska, 2012

  • Mirrored Casket, Ferguson

    National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, D.C.

  • 18th Or 19th Century Slavery Shackles

    National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, D.C.

  • Frederick Douglass Jr. Hair

    Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Nebraska

  • FBI Files On Malcolm X

    Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Nebraska

  • Rev. And Mrs. Loguen

    Onondaga Historical Association, Syracuse, New York

  • Rossetta Douglass Hair

    Nebraska State Historical Society, Lincoln, Nebraska

  • Postcards

    Printed in Germany, Paul R. Schopp Collection, Riverton, New Jersey

  • Confederate Shell Fort Sumter 1861

    Alexander Library, Special Collections, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Clarkson’s Abolition Of The Slave Trade 1808

    Salem County Historical Society, New Jersey

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/this-chilling-photo-collection-captures-fascinating-black-history-artifacts_us_58af1950e4b060480e05b5bd?spfee5nv8lknpnwmi&ncid=inblnkushpmg00000009